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Are millennials ‘killing’ divorce?

The millennial generation, those between the ages of 22 and 37 in 2018, face blame for negatively impacting everything from sit-down restaurants to the diamond industry. One new thing that millennials stand accused of “killing” is divorce.

Divorce is down among millennials and Gen Xers (those between 38 and 53 in 2018) alike for a few different reasons. First and foremost is that fact that both of these demographics are waiting longer to get married. Statistically, waiting until the late 20s or early 30s to marry results in a smaller chance of divorce, while couples who marry in their late teens and early 20s are more likely to split.

Both of these generations are more educated than those of prior generations, and they also have access to a wealth of resources, including relationship counseling, individual therapy, apps, and more, designed to help strengthen both the marriage itself and each spouse personally. Statistically, enhanced knowledge on the part of the parties, be it a college education or more access to counseling, also lowers the rate of divorce.  

Millennials and Gen Xers are also more likely to cohabitate instead of getting married. Needless to say, if you don’t get married, you won’t end up divorced.

Waiting to marry until establishing a career and completing post-secondary education is likewise driving up the rate of prenuptial agreements among millennials. Spouses are coming into marriage with an established income, perhaps a home or children from a prior relationship, and with their own debts. Student loan debts in particular on both sides of the marriage are being addressed in prenuptial agreements instead of in divorce filings.